Nuclear Leeds

Facilities

Nuclear

A significant amount of funding is being invested in providing world-class nuclear research facilities at the University of Leeds, and in strategically growing our research team and capability.

Laser Lab

The laser lab houses a Class 4 Nd:YAG Laser supplied by Litron Lasers. The laser is double pulsed and outputs light at a wavelength of 532nm, which is split into a light sheet through the use of several optics. The laser is used to study fluid flows via the illumination of particles suspended in the flow, at present this is being done within an impinging jet tank.

Flow Loops

A new pipe flow laboratory is being commissioned and contains two flow loops. The first, horizontal loop (70 mm) incorporates a laser-based particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement system and will be used to investigate the near-wall flow behaviour in multiphase flows. The second loop (28 mm) can be configured for horizontal, vertical or inclined flow and incorporates acoustic instrumentation and pressure transducers for performing in-line rheometry of complex, high-viscosity and flocculated suspensions, as well as measuring particle velocity and concentration and investigating the flow conditions corresponding to settled bed formation and evolution.

Uranics Lab

The University is currently investing over £1.25m into specialist laboratory facilitates, including new uranics laboratories providing researchers at Leeds, and from across the UK, with wet and dry process engineering facilities and a rig hall, opening up new opportunities for work on the nuclear fuel cycle. The laboratory suite is scheduled to open in mid-2016.

Sorby Laboratory

Within the Sorby laboratory our instrumentation includes a range of Particle Imaging Velocimetry systems, which allow complex turbulent flow fields to be quantified in three dimensions, a two-component Laser Doppler Anemometry system, a Phase Doppler Anemometry system and a range of acoustic Doppler velocity profiler systems. These instruments are ideally suited to collecting high spatial and temporal resolution velocity data (in both two and three dimensions) for the validation of numerical models, which are becoming increasingly complex in order to deal with real-world problems.